On the 5th January 2022, the Office for National Statistics released detailed univariate data from the 2021 Census covering the theme of ‘Housing’.

This release includes three key areas of data:

Housing Accommodation Type
Tenure
Number of Rooms
Occupancy Rating of Rooms
Number of Bedrooms
Occupancy Rating of Bedrooms
Central Heating
Car or Van Availability
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)
Communal Establishment Residents Communal Establishment Residents by Age and Sex
Communal Establishment Management and Type
Middle Super Output Area (MSOA)
Middle Super Output Area (MSOA)
Second Addresses Second Address Indicator
Purpose of Second Address
Output Area (OA)
Output Area (OA)



As soon as this data has been processed it will be added to the Data Observatory and this page will be updated to sign post to the relevant profiles.

In the meantime, you can access the data directly from the ONS website HERE

You can find infographics highlighting the headline results for Hull here:

Summary Infographic: Housing Type

Summary Infographic: Housing Tenure and Communal Establishments

Below you will find summary information for Hull which includes, for each of the three key areas listed above:

  • Headline results
  • Maps of useful datasets at Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) / Middle Super Output Area (MSOA) Level
  • HOUSING

      SUMMARY
  • At Census Day, 21 March 2021, 84.5% (97,561) of households in Hull lived in a house or bungalow, 15.4% (17,748) lived in a flat, maisonette or apartment, and 0.1% (162) lived in a caravan, or other mobile or temporary structure.
  • Compared to England, a larger proportion of households in Hull live in a house or bungalow, and a smaller proportion of households in Hull live in a flat, maisonette or apartment.
  • Nationally, the largest increase since the 2011 Census occurred in households living in a flat, maisonette or apartment. However, in Hull this figure fell from 16.3% (18,306) in 2011 to 15.4% (17,748%) in 2021.
  • In 2021, 48.8%, (56,326) of households owned the accommodation they lived in, 27.0% (31,167) rented their accommodation from a social landlord (including the LA), 23.9% (27,593) rented their accommodation from a private landlord, and 0.3% (389) of households lived rent free.
  • Compared to England, a larger proportion of households in Hull rent their accommodation from a social landlord (including the LA), and a smaller proportion of households in Hull own the accommodation they live in.
  • Since the 2011 Census occurred the largest increase has been in those households who rent their accommodation from a private landlord, from 20.4% (22,984) in 2011 to 23.9% (27,593) in 2021.
  • In Hull, 4,146 households (3.6%) have fewer bedrooms than required, This is a lower proportion than nationally (4.4%), and a reduction from 4.3% (4,791) in 2011.
  • Almost all households in Hull reported that they had central heating in 2021 (98.2%, 113,378); of these, 0.3% (386) used at least one renewable energy source.
  • In 2021, 35.1% (74,996) of households in Hull had no cars or vans. This is down from 40.6% (45,748) in 2011, but significantly higher than the national figure (23.5%).

    • DETAIL

    Accommodation Type

    In 2021, there were 115,471 households in Hull, in which 262,426 usual residents (98.3% of all usual residents) lived.

    The number of households has increased by 2,875 (2.6%) since 2011 (from 112,596).

    Around 8 in 10 households in Hull lived in houses or bungalows, a small increase across the last decade (from 83.7%, 94,211 in 2011 to 84.5%, 97,651 in 2021).

    More detailed data showed small changes in the proportion of households living in different types of houses or bungalow including:

  • 53,953 households in Hull (46.7% of all households) were in terraced properties, down from 49.1% (55,313) in 2011
  • 33,932 (29.4%) were in semi-detached properties, up from 30,854 (27.4%) in 2011
  • 9,676 (8.4%) were in detached properties, up from 8,044 (7.1%) in 2011

  • Hull (2021) England (2021) Hull (2011)
    Detached House 9,676 (8.4%) 22.9% 8,044 (7.1%)
    Semi-Detached House 33,932 (29.4%) 31.5% 30,854 (27.4%)
    Terraced House 53,953 (46.7%) 23.0% 55,313 (49.1%)
    Purpose-built block of flats or tenement 13,165 (11.4%) 17.1% 13,910 (12.4%)
    Part of a converted or shared house / building (including bed-sits) 3,512 (3.0%) 4.3% 3,236 (2.9%)
    Flat, maisonette or apartment in a commercial building 1,071 (0.9%) 0.8% 1,160 (1.0%)
    Caravan or other mobile or temporary structure 162 (0.1%) 0.4% 79 (0.1%)


    Unlike nationally, there was a small decrease in households in Hull in a flat, maisonette or apartment. In 2021, 15.4% (17,748) of households were in a flat, maisonette or apartment, down from 16.3% (18,306) in 2011.

    The remaining 0.1% (162) were households that lived in a caravan, or other mobile or temporary structure. This was similar to the proportion in 2011, but with an increase in numbers (0.1%, 879).

    Compared to England, Hull has a significantly lower proportion of detached properties (8.4% of households in Hull compared to 22.9% of households nationally) and a significantly higher proportion of terraced properties (46.7% of households in Hull compared to 23.0% of households nationally).

    2021 Census Map: Households in Houses and Bungalows (LSOA)
    2021 Census Map: Households in Houses and Bungalows (LSOA)
    2021 Census Map: Households in Caravans and Other Mobile or Temporary Structures (LSOA)

    Tenure

    Tenure is whether a household rents or owns the accommodation that it occupies. Households that rent their accommodation were asked what type of landlord owns or manages it.

    The census data on tenure in Hull show:

  • whilst there has been a small increase (+36) in the number of households that owned their accommodation (including shared ownership), from 56,290 in 2011 to 56,326 in 2021, the proportion of households that owned their accommodation (including shared ownership) has actually fallen slightly from 50.0% to 48.8%.
  • there has been an increase in the proportion of households that rented their accommodation (both social rented and private rented), to 50.9%, 58,760, in 2021 (from 48.5%, 54,618, in 2011).
  • there has been a decrease in the proportion of households that lived rent free, to 0.3%, 389, in 2021 (from 1.5%, 1,688, in 2011).


  • The data on accommodation ownership and renting can be broken down further to show that:

  • 23.1% of households (26,695) owned the accommodation they lived in outright, an increase from 19.9% (22,355) in 2011.
  • 25.2% (29,046) owned their accommodation with a mortgage or loan or shared ownership, which is a decrease from 29.7% (33,430) in 2011.
  • 27.0% (31,167) rented their accommodation from a social landlord (including the council), which is a decrease from 28.1% (31,634) in 2011.
  • 23.9% (27,593) rented their accommodation privately, up from 20.4% (22,984) in 2011

  • Hull (2021) England (2021) Hull (2011)
    Owned: Owned Outright 26,695 (23.1%) 32.5% 22,355 (19.9%)
    Owned: Owned With Mortgage / Loan 29,046 (25.2%) 28.8% 33,430 (29.7%)
    Shared Ownership 585 (0.5%) 1.0% 505 (0.4%)
    Social Rented: Rented From Council / Local Authority 21,768 (18.9%) 8.3% 23,838 (21.2%)
    Social Rented: Other Social Rented 9,399 (8.1%) 8.8% 7,796 (6.9%)
    Private Rented: Rented From Private Landlord / Letting Agency 25,419 (22.0%) 18.2% 21,414 (19.0%)
    Private Rented: Other Private Rented 2,174 (1.9%) 2.2% 1,570 (1.4%)
    Lives Rent Free 389 (0.3%) 0.1% 1,688 (1.5%)



    Compared to England, a significantly lower proportion of households in Hull are owned outright (23.1% of households in Hull compared to 32.5% of households nationally) and a significantly higher proportion of households in Hull are rented from the council / local authority (18.9% of households in Hull compared to 8.3% of households nationally).

    2021 Census Map: Owned / Shared Ownership Households (LSOA)
    2021 Census Map: Social Rented Households (LSOA)
    2021 Census Map: Private Rented Households (LSOA)

    Rooms

    Census 2021 used Valuation Office Agency (VOA) data to count the number of rooms in a dwelling. This was instead of using the approach from previous censuses of asking the question on the census form. All rooms in a dwelling apart from bathrooms, toilets, halls or landings, kitchens, conservatories, or utility rooms are counted. For households living in a shared dwelling, the number of rooms are counted for the whole dwelling and not the individual household.

    Across Hull, 10.7% (12,374) of households had one or two rooms, 82.3% (95,070) had three, four or five rooms, 6.7% (7,691) had six, seven or eight rooms and 0.3% (338) had nine or more rooms.

    Compared to nationally, Hull has a higher proportion of households with 3 or 4 rooms (62.9% in Hull compared to 51.1% nationally) and a lower proportion of households with five or more rooms (26.3% in Hull compared to 37.7% nationally).

    The VOA method for counting number of rooms differs in several ways from the method used in the 2011 Census. For example, the VOA method includes storage rooms (which were excluded in the 2011 Census) but excludes kitchens, conservatories, and utility rooms (which were included in the 2011 Census). For this reason, Census 2021 data on number of rooms should not be directly compared with the equivalent 2011 Census data.

    2021 Census Map: Average Rooms Per Household (LSOA)

    Bedrooms

    As in 2011, Census 2021 directly asked about the number of bedrooms available to the household.

    The data show that the proportion of households in Hull with one or two bedrooms decreased across the past decade, whereas the proportion with three or more bedrooms increased:

  • 11.8% (13,631) of households had one bedroom (down from 12.8%, 14,438 in 2011)
  • 33.5% (38,702) had two bedrooms (down from 34.4%, 38,765 in 2011)
  • 43.7% (50,467) had three bedrooms (up from 42.4%, 47,796 in 2011)
  • 11.0% (12,672) had four or more bedrooms (up from 10.0%, 11,313 in 2011)


  • Compared to nationally, Hull has a higher proportion of households with 2 bedrooms (33.5% in Hull compared to 27.3% nationally) and a lower proportion of households with four or more rooms (11.0% in Hull compared to 21.1% nationally).

    2021 Census Map: Average Bedrooms Per Household (LSOA)

    Overcrowding and Under-Occupancy

    Occupancy rating provides a measure of whether a household’s accommodation is overcrowded or under-occupied.

    An occupancy rating of negative 1 or less implies that a household has fewer bedrooms than the standard requirement, positive 1 implies that they have more bedrooms than required, and 0 implies that they met the standard required.

    Across Hull, 3.6% of households (4,146) had fewer bedrooms than required, down from 4.3% (4,791) in 2011.

    Some 30.3% (34,970) of households had the required number of bedrooms, and the remaining 66.1% (76,356) of households had more bedrooms than required.

    Hull (2021) England (2021) Hull (2011)
    Bedroom Occupancy Rating: +2 or More 31,467 (27.3%) 35.6% 29,218 (25.9%)
    Bedroom Occupancy Rating: +1 44,889 (38.9%) 33.2% 44,393 (39.4%)
    Bedroom Occupancy Rating: 0 34,970 (30.3%) 26.8% 34,194 (30.4%)
    Bedroom Occupancy Rating: -1 3,625 (3.1%) 3.6% 4,298 (3.8%)
    Bedroom Occupancy Rating: -2 or Less 521 (0.5%) 0.7% 493 (0.4%)



    2021 Census Map: Bedroom Over Occupancy (LSOA)
    2021 Census Map: Bedroom Under Occupancy (LSOA)

    Central Heating

    The vast majority of households in Hull reported that they had central heating in 2021 (98.2%, 113,378).

    However, 1.8% (2,093) of households in Hull had no central heating; compared to 1.5% nationally.

    This is a notable reduction from 3.9% of households in Hull (4,431) in 2011.

    The most common types of central heating in Hull were, mains gas (80.1%, 92,488), two or more types of central heating (not including renewable energy; 8.5%, 9,755) and electric (7.1%, 8,169).

    For the first time, Census 2021 recorded whether a household’s central heating used renewable energy sources. Overall, 0.3% of households in Hull (386) used at least one renewable energy source. A total of 0.2% (267) reported using renewable energy alongside another type of central heating, and the remaining 0.1% (119) used only renewable energy sources.

    The proportion of households using at least one renewable energy source in Hull was lower than nationally (0.9%).

    2021 Census Map: Households With No Central Heating (LSOA)

    Find out more about how homes are heated in your neighbourhood

    Car or Van Availability

    As in previous censuses, Census 2021 asked households how many cars or vans the household owned or had available to them. In 2021:

  • 35.1% (40,476) of households had no cars or vans (down from 40.6%, 45,748 in 2011)
  • 42.7% (49,284) had one car or van (up slightly from 42.3%, 47,612 in 2011)
  • 18.2% (21,034) had two cars or vans (up from 14.2%, 16,002 in 2011)
  • 4.1% (4,678) had three or more cars or vans (up from 2.9%, 3,234 in 2011)

  • Hull (2021) England (2021) Hull (2011)
    No Cars or Vans 40,476 (35.1%) 23.5% 45,748 (40.6%)
    1 Car or Van 49,284 (42.7%) 41.3% 47,612 (42.3%)
    2 Cars or Vans 21,034 (18.2%) 26.1% 16,002 (14.2%)
    3 or More Cars or Vans 4,678 (4.1%) 9.1% 3,234 (2.9%)



    Despite the notable decrease over the last decade in households in Hull with no car or van, the current proportion of households in Hull with no car or van (35.1%) is still significantly higher than nationally (23.5%).

    Likewise, the proportion of households in Hull with 2 or more cars / vans (22.3%) is significantly lower than nationally (35.2%).

    2021 Census Map: Households With No Car / Van (LSOA)

    COMMUNAL ESTABLISHMENT RESIDENTS

      SUMMARY
  • In 2021, there were 4,587 communal establishment residents in Hull.
  • The number of those living in communal establishments has risen by 929 since 2011 from 3,658.
  • This is an increase of 25.4%, compared to an increase of 3.5% nationally.
  • In total, 55.0% of communal establishment residents were male (2,440) and 45.0% were female (1,999).
  • Over a third (39.0%, 1,733) of communal establishment residents were aged 16 to 24 years, and a further quarter (25.9%, 1,154) were aged 75 years and over.
  • Over a third of communal establishment residents (33.9%, 1,556) lived in education establishments, and over a third (35.3%, 1,618) were in private care homes (both with and without nursing).

    • DETAIL

    A communal establishment is an establishment with full-time or part-time supervision providing residential accommodation, such as student halls of residence, boarding schools, armed forces bases, hospitals, care homes, and prisons.

    When interpreting the data, it is important to keep in mind that the census was conducted during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which may have affected the number of residents in certain types of communal establishment. For example, the disruption of international travel may have led to a lower number of students in education establishments than would otherwise have been expected, because of a reduction in the number of students arriving from overseas.

    In 2021, there were 4,587 usual residents in Hull who lived in communal establishments.

    The number of people living in communal establishments has risen by almost 929 since 2011 (when 3,658 lived in communal establishments).

    In our statistics, we distinguish between those who are resident in a communal establishment and those who manage or work in it (and their families). We provide breakdowns by sex and age for residents, but not for the smaller numbers of the owners and staff of communal establishments, their family members, and those who were staying in a communal establishment temporarily with no usual UK address.

    The breakdown by sex for this group showed that 55.0% of communal establishment residents (2,440) were male and 45.0% (1,999) were female. This differs from both the breakdown of communal establishment residents nationally, and the breakdown of the larger Hull population, where there are slightly more females than males.

    The breakdown by age shows that the communal establishment resident population is mostly concentrated within two age groups. Overall, 39.9% of communal establishment residents (1,733) were aged 16 to 24 years. It is likely that this group primarily consists of those in education establishments, such as university halls of residence or boarding schools, which was the most common type of establishment that residents lived in.

    A further 25.9% (1,151) were aged 75 years and over. The breakdown by sex within this age group shows that the percentage of females was much higher than the percentage of males (especially amongst those aged 85 years and over). This may reflect the care home communal establishment population and the difference in life expectancy between men and women.

    The most common type of communal establishment was “Education”, which includes university halls of residence and boarding schools. In total, 33.9% of communal establishment residents (1,556) were in education establishments. This was an increase of 1,030 from 2011 (up from 526, 14.4%). This is most likely to reflect the growth in the number of university students in England and Wales across the past decade, and may also reflect changes in student housing choices.

    A further 35.3% of communal establishment residents (1,618) were in private care homes, down from 52.0% (1,897) in 2011. Of these:

  • 28.3% (1,296) were in private care homes without nursing (down from 1,674 in 2011)
  • 7.0% (322) were in private care homes with nursing (up from 223 in 2011)


  • There were considerably fewer people residing in other types of communal establishments:

  • 723 (15.8% of all communal establishment residents) were in prison, probation or detention centres
  • 195 (4.3%) were in staff or worker accommodation within the communal establishment or listed another type of communal establishment
  • 87 (1.9%) were in a hostel or temporary shelter for the homeless
  • 75 (1.6%) were in a local authority care home without nursing


  • There have been small changes to housing definitions since the 2011 Census, meaning some sheltered housing units were enumerated as communal establishments in 2011 but as households in 2021. Users should keep this in mind when comparing 2011 and 2021 census data for this topic, as described in Housing variables Census 2021.

    2021 Census Map: Residents of Communal Establishments (MSOA)

    SECOND ADDRESSES

      SUMMARY
  • Overall, 13,137 usual residents in Hulls (4.9% of the population) reported staying at a second address for more than 30 days a year.
  • This is slightly lower than the national figure (5.4%).
  • Whilst the number people in Hull who used a second address has increased slightly since 2011, when the number was 12,746, the percentage has actually fallen from 5.0%.
  • Overall, 11,498 usual residents in Hull (4.3%) used a second address in the UK and 1,639 usual residents (0.6%) used a second address outside the UK.
  • The most common types of second address were another parent or guardian’s address (used by 5,068 people, 1.9% of all usual residents) and students’ home addresses (3,603, 1.3%)
  • With these data it is important to consider the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, for instance students may have been more likely to be residing at their parent or guardians’ address for the whole academic year with no use of a second term-time address.

    • DETAIL

    In addition to reporting their primary address, Census 2021 also asked respondents to report whether they stay at another address for more than 30 days a year. If they answered yes, they were then asked the purpose of the second address, and whether it is within or outside the UK.

    Census 2021 showed that 13,137 usual residents in Hull (4.9% of the population) stayed at a second address for more than 30 days a year. This is below the national figure of 5.4%. Whilst it is an increase in number compared to 2011, when 12,746 people reported staying at a second address for more than 30 days a year; it represents a small reduction in the proportion of all usual residents from 5.0%.

    Among those in Hull who used a second address, 11,498 (4.3% of the usual resident population) used a second address within the UK. This is an increase from 10,200 (4.0%) in 2011. The remaining 1,639 (0.6% of the usual resident population) used a second address outside the UK, which is a decrease compared with 2011 (2,546, 1.0%).

    People who reported the use of a second address were asked “What is that address?” and given a list of eight options to choose from.

    As in 2011, the most common type of second address in 2021 was “Another parent or guardian’s address”, which would have been selected for children whose parents were separated or lived apart. This was selected by 5,068 people in 2021 (1.9% of the usual resident population).

    The next largest group was “Student’s home address”, at 3,603 (1.3%). The number in this group is likely to be lower than usual due to a coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic effect, as fewer students would have been staying at a term-time address than would otherwise have been expected.

    For the first time, the question about second addresses also included a tick-box response for the use of a “partner’s address”. In 2021, 1,112 people (0.4%) reported using this type of second address.

    2021 Census Map: Residents with a Second Address (LSOA)